Why tall wooden buildings must be our future: a visual essay by Michael Green — July 9, 2013

Why tall wooden buildings must be our future: a visual essay by Michael Green

Great concepts.

TED Blog

[ted_talkteaser id=1785]”Like snowflakes, no two pieces of wood can be the same anywhere on earth,” says architect Michael Green in today’s lyrical TED talk, “Why we should build wooden skyscrapers,” in which he lays out his thesis for designing and engineering the world’s tallest buildings from one of its oldest materials. “Mother Nature has fingerprints in our buildings,” he says proudly.

We asked Green to share more of his thinking around wooden buildings. And boy, did he deliver. With this beautiful visual essay, he lays out his reasoning for wanting to use the material in buildings of all shapes, heights and sizes. He also answers common critiques of the concept — and then lays down a challenge for the world’s engineers and developers to get involved in pushing the boundaries of the possible. You know. Just for good measure. Our thanks to him and the team at Michael…

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10 jaw-dropping images from the film “Mars et Avril,” and how the magic was created — June 7, 2013

10 jaw-dropping images from the film “Mars et Avril,” and how the magic was created

Seeing a movie like this on this budget is just amazing. Listen to his lecture on TED Talks as he talks about turning problems into solutions.

TED Blog

Science-fiction films do not come cheap. Star Trek Into Darkness reportedly had a budget of $190 million, while the Will and Jaden Smith vehicle After Earth, which opens this weekend, cost $130 million. (Side note: Jaden Smith recently shared with New York Magazine that his dad watches “hours and hours of TED Talks.”) That’s why it’s so thoroughly amazing that Mars et Avril, a stunning sci-fi epic set in Montreal 50 years in the future, was made with a budget of just $2.3 million.

[ted_talkteaser id=1760]”I made a film that was impossible to make, only I didn’t know it was impossible,” says scriptwriter, director and producer Martin Villeneuve in today’s TED Talk, given at TED2013.

In the talk, naturally, Villeneuve reveals how he did this: with very creative problem-solving. For example, when Canadian superstar Robert Lepage said he would only have a few days available for filming, Villeneuve opted to turn…

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Bill Gates: Teachers need real feedback — May 20, 2013
Jason Fried: Why work doesn’t happen at work — November 30, 2012

Jason Fried: Why work doesn’t happen at work

Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn’t a good place to do it. In his talk, he lays out the main problems (call them the M&Ms) and offers three suggestions to make work work. (Filmed atTEDxMidWest.)

Jason Fried

Jason Fried thinks deeply about collaboration, productivity and the nature of work. He’s the co-founder of 37signals, makers of Basecamp and other web-based collaboration tools, and co-author of “Rework.”

 

http://waernst.com

Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world — November 25, 2012

Clay Shirky: How cognitive surplus will change the world

Clay Shirky looks at “cognitive surplus” — the shared, online work we do with our spare brain cycles. While we’re busy editing Wikipedia, posting to Ushahidi (and yes, making LOLcats), we’re building a better, more cooperative world.

Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky argues that the history of the modern world could be rendered as the history of ways of arguing, where changes in media change what sort of arguments are possible — with deep social and political implications.

Alain de Botton: A kinder, gentler philosophy of success — November 23, 2012

Alain de Botton: A kinder, gentler philosophy of success

Alain de Botton examines our ideas of success and failure — and questions the assumptions underlying these two judgments. Is success always earned? Is failure? He makes an eloquent, witty case to move beyond snobbery to find true pleasure in our work.

Alain de Botton

Through his witty and literate books — and his new School of Life — Alain de Botton helps others find fulfillment in the everyday.

Cool Turkey! — November 22, 2012
Nigel Marsh: How to make work-life balance work — November 21, 2012
Susan Cain: The Power of Introverts —
Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation — November 19, 2012

Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation

Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don’t: Traditional rewards aren’t always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward.

Dan Pink

Bidding adieu to his last “real job” as Al Gore’s speechwriter, Dan Pink went freelance to spark a right-brain revolution in the career marketplace.